Are You Ready for Your Video Close-Up?

January 09, 2015    |    Brad Holst

I was wildly excited when Harvard Business Publishing invited me to travel to its headquarters to record my initial three videos for its ManageMentor® curriculum. 


Excitement turns to dread.

This opportunity had the potential to boost Mandel’s profile, as well as my own. But, my excitement quickly turned to stomach-churning dread, as I began to think about what would need to happen in order to be successful. 


Three questions haunted my thoughts, day and night.

Those questions were:

  1. How do I create brief yet compelling and useful video content?
  2. How do I connect on camera with my audience in an engaging and credible way?
  3. How do I manage nerves and anxiety during production?

The truth is, for your video to be worthy of watching, you have to be able to answer these three questions prior to recording it.


Unlock your video potential. 

Professionals across every industry are increasingly using video to educate, entertain, and train employees and customers.  But, many people are still uncomfortable with — or lack the skills to effectively use — this technology.

As a result, they’re missing out on its huge potential as a tool for educating, coaching, mentoring, problem-solving, collaborating, marketing, selling, etc. Its business applications are limited only by your imagination.

The good news? Anyone can learn the skills required to effectively communicate on video — and develop a level of comfort doing so.


So, how did the Harvard ManageMentor videos turn out?

To my great relief, the first three videos were so well-received, HBR invited Mandel back to introduce its entire presentation skills curriculum.

Watch that introductory video on why presentation skills matter here.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll share the three other videos with you, highlighting important ways you can prepare for and improve your presentations on-screen and off.

Why not make 2015 the year you add presenting via video to your communication repertoire? Just imagine how your organization — and your own career — could benefit.